And now, the continuation of “what do you look for in a Junior”.

(If you watch the TV show Hell’s Kitchen, you’ll know what I mean…)

If not, then just enjoy.

1- What do you look for in Juniors? When interviewing, or when you have an intern, what differentiates one from the rest?  

Creative Director, Hispanic Advertising Agency 

Passion, passion, passion. What I’m always looking for is passion and commitment. A person who is really interested to work at the agency and to go the extra mile for advertising. Someone who is hungry to do, and to do and to do more. Somebody who knows his/her limitations and is willing to learn. No smart-ass or cocky attitude, we have a lot of that going on already. Someone who will  inspire me, and remind me why I chose this career when I was a Junior.

I’m looking for human quality. Good chemistry. Good people. To set an example, I was given a questionnaire at one of the best creative agencies when they were interviewing me, it was full of personal questions such as: what was the last movie that you saw? What was the last book that you read? What was the last song that you heard? What is the worse think that you have done to a friend that you can tell me? Why would you live in a State that has the death penalty? I look for someone who I can get along with.

 

Joker, from Why Advertising Sucks? (http://adssuck.blogspot.com/)

The word Junior should be an indicator of what you’re looking for, which in essence is a diamond in the rough. Possibly great talent that is clueless in regard to their potential value to a creative team. By clueless I don’t just mean that they need to learn some tricks, it’s that they’re confident, eager to learn, humble. It’s like a modified fraternity/sorority, you want the person to want to fit in, but you don’t want them to be dumb enough to do EVERYTHING you tell them to do.

As for what differentiates one from the rest, I can sum it up in five things:

1. Focus – knowing there’s a good idea in there somewhere.

2. Flexibility – choosing battles, willing to play by the established rules and accepting a margin of error.

3. Ability to get along with others – self explanatory and you’d be surprised how much it’s lacking lately.

4. Discipline – The day isn’t over until the job gets done. It’s a shitty axiom, and there are exceptions, but that’s the difference between a due date, and a deadline. Deadlines are never to be messed with.

5. Humility – Being genuine is important and I lost count of how many people wanted to impress me, or show me how much they know about x or y thing. I want to know you and what you’ll bring to the team, not how well you’ll get me because we will not be best friends and I will not get you a promotion. 

 

  

2- Ideas vs. Very polished books? Would you rather hire a Junior with great ideas and so so design skills, or a Junior with a highly polished book that you know they spent 2 years tweaking in portfolio school?

 Creative Director, Hispanic Advertising Agency

I always prefer a good idea over great design skills. You can always teach the software skills to anybody, that’s easy. But you can not teach them to think of brilliant ideas. You can not teach the passion for advertising. You can not teach the willingness to keep trying and keep going. Now, if you have great ideas and great design skills, I’m in, no questions asked!

 

Joker, from Why Advertising Sucks? (http://adssuck.blogspot.com/) 

I’m a fan of good ideas, but I recognize the value of a polished book. Here’s the thing though, a good idea transcends a mediocre layout. You see something there. I’ve always been extremely skeptical with really polished books because guess what, I know TONS of hacks with kick ass books. I’m talking douchy people with great self selling skills and who are a waste of time, energy and money.

 

Tomorrow, we will have whole new set of questions! Stay tuned and remember that you can still submit your questions… please? Anyone there? Yes? No?

Oh well, I’ll still post the answers anyways. 

 

Love,

Brook. 

 

 

 

 

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